AAEEBL NEConference
AAEEBL Northeast USA Regional Conference
at Boston University, March 12-13
ePortfolios and Digital Technologies in the Post-Course Era:
Fostering Reflective and Integrative Learning in College, Career, and Life

AAEEBLConferencelogo2015

AAEEBL 2015 Annual Conference Call for Proposals

Moving Beyond “One-Size-Fits-All” by targeting Three Strategic and Transformative Approaches:
Evidence-Based Learning; Personalized Learning, and Holistic Outcomes Assessment
Proposal deadline:  February 19, 2015

Hynes Convention Center
900 Boylston Street
Boston, MA  02115
United States

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Is Your First Grader College Ready?

FEB. 4, 2015

Thought provoking video, Age 6 and Applying to College posted article.
“What is college?  Get that thought into their heads.  Even though they’re 6 years old, they can think about that until they get to  high school and the process becomes real”

This New York Times article brought to mind a post from this blog in which I quoted a condescending educator, perturbed by learning from play,“young students don’t want to learn, they want to play, and presentations like the one I saw today essentially seem to be  saying that we need to support this play (masked as educational needs) as much as possible in order to try to get some learning in there.”  (see Instructor Attitudes and Biases)

Are we undermining the robust worth and value of play and learning?  Our government and schools are in such a hurry to retire seasoned teachers, our schools are losing wisdom and common sense experience.  Are they still teaching the value of play and learning in our Colleges of Education? Piaget?

Instructor Attitudes and Biases … have we grown?

While going over my past bloggings, I came across a 2008 post in which I commented on my bewilderment (almost rage) triggered by another blog, Thoughts on Learning Spaces (2008).  I had provided a link to the post from that blog that had set me off.  The blogger referred to the student population of 2008 as Gen Y and implied that they were lazy learners.   Fortunately, the links I had posted to those demeaning comments were broken and the blog no longer existed.   I had every intention of deleting my old post, but as I reread the quoted comment from the other blog, I slowly started to burn, again. Here is the comment.


You know why a student would prefer to look at a picture or watch a video? Because it’s way easier than reading something that would nearly always be more informative about the subject at hand. You know why a student would be more interested in producing, say, a video than writing a paper? Because writing well is DIFFICULT and it’s far easier to gloss up poor research by packaging it in a video format that appears to involve a lot of work. Yes, older people who think that games, social networks, collaborative learning environments, and the creation audiovisual mashups are the future of education, the basic message I’m sending here is that young students don’t want to learn, they want to play, and presentations like the one I saw today essentially seem to be saying that we need to support this play (masked as educational needs) as much as possible in order to try to get some learning in there.  I’d like to hear some thoughts and comments from our group on this issue. It’s an important topic. Please comment on the discussion forum, “Are we experiencing a Generational Gap in Education?I so curious to know if the blogger has had a change of opinion towards multimedia, games, and the value of play in learning.  As I reread this post, the statement, “You know why a student would be more interested in producing, say, a video than writing a paper? Because writing well is DIFFICULT and it’s far easier to gloss up poor research by packaging it in a video format that appears to involve a lot of work.  (2008)


First, it’s obvious the blogger has never produced a podcast or digital story.  I’d like to think this person has had a change in attitude about multimedia and learning, but I seriously doubt it.  (I’ll share my personal teaching story about a student triumphant and a video podcast later.)   However, have we improved as educators since the time this blog was active and accessible?  It’s 2015 and have we learned anything about our students as individual learners?  Does this attitude still exits in the hallowed halls of Academe?  I believe many of us have embraced the values of multimodal media learning experiences for our students; but, there are still actively vocal, condescending holdouts muddying the waters of productive student-centered learning environments.  Yes, some fear change;  but, instead of attempting to understand, many react with negative and demeaning voices towards educators and their students shifting the instructor-centered classroom experience to a more experiential, student-centered learning environment.  The blogger, and many others, point fingers and close their minds to the skills and abilities this learning generation will need to enter the workforce and become productive citizens in 21 century society.  Again, this was written in 2008, but pockets of this disrespectful attitude and self-imposed lack of understanding can still be found in the educational venues of today.

I also posted and commented on another blog from 2008,  A Vision of Students Today (What Teachers Must Do)At the time, the blog owner seemed just as frustrated. 
http://www.clappingtrees.com/archives/2009/01/a-vision-of-students-today-what-teachers-must-do  The blogger posts,

HOW DID INSTITUTIONS DESIGNED FOR LEARNING become so widely hated by people who love learning? It’s been almost two years (spring 2007) since Dr Michael Wesch of Kansas State University invited the 200 students in his “Introduction to Cultural Anthropology” class to tell the world what they think of their education by helping him script a video for YouTube

Have we grown as educators since 2008-09?  What is the Vision of Students Today in the 2015 classroom?  What are the societal demands on these students and what must we do to help them become productive citizens, today…2015?

Is your course designed for instruction or learning?

Learning Paradigm
Learning Paradigm- Flipped Classroom Approach
Instruction Paradigm - Lecture and Note Taking
Instruction Paradigm – Lecture and Note Taking

Design and Review your course considering your focus –  Delivery of Instruction or Student-Engagement

I use Barr’s and Tagg’s, A New Paradigm for Undergraduate Education, Comparing Educational Paradigms Chart for guiding faculty through course design and students with effective course evaluation.  Items on my checklists are designed and modified from the following four (4) categories with items listed below. (The wording of checklist statements vary from instance to instance of use.) The 1995 article is given to faculty and students for discussion. Surprisingly, some students read it and, after class group discussions, give serious consideration to their course evaluation comments.  The students that read it are the group discussion leaders.  The article and chart are used for pre and post reviews of traditional, hybrid, and online courses by the faculty.  Article:  Robert B. Barr and John Tagg, From Teaching to Learning-A New Paradigm for Undergraduate Education, Change, Vol.27. No. 6 (1995), http://www.maine.edu/pdf/BarrandTagg.pdf

  1. Mission and Purposes

Instruction Paradigm

  • Provide/deliver instruction
  • Transfer knowledge from faculty to students
  • Offer courses and programs
  • Improve the quality of instruction
  • Achieve accessfor diverse students

Learning Paradigm

  • Produce learning
  • Elicit students discovery and construction of knowledge
  • Create powerful learning environments
  • Improve the quality of learning
  • Achieve successfor diverse students student
  1. Criteria for Success

Instruction Paradigm

  • Learning varies
  • Inputs, resources
  • Quality of entering students
  • Curriculum development, expansion
  • Quantity and quality of resources
  • Enrollment, revenue growth
  • Quality of faculty, instruction

Learning Paradigm

  • Learning varies
  • Learning & student-success outcomes
  • Quality of exiting students
  • Learning technologies development
  • Quantity and quality of outcomes
  • Aggregate learning growth, efficiency
  • Quality of students, learning

  1. Teaching/Learning Structures

Instruction Paradigm

  • Atomistic; parts prior to whole
  • Time held constant, learning varies
  • 50-minute lecture,3-unit course
  • Classes start/end at same time
  • One teacher, one classroom
  • Independent disciplines, departments
  • Covering material
  • End-of-course assessment
  • Grading within classes by instructors

Learning Paradigm

  • Holistic; whole prior to parts
  • Learning held constant, time varies
  • Learning environments
  • Environment ready when student is
  • Whatever learning experience works
  • Cross discipline/department
  • Specified learning results
  • Pre/during/post assessments
  • External evaluations of learning
  • Public assessment
  • Degree equals demonstrated knowledge & skills
  1. Learning Theory

Instruction Paradigm

  • Knowledge exists “out there”
  • Knowledge comes in chunks and bits;
  • delivered by instructors and gotten by students

Learning Paradigm

  • Knowledge exists in each person’s mind and is shaped by individual experience

How do you design and review your course and student learning?  Please comment and give us tips.

Mind and Concept Mapping Tools for Flipping the Classroom

Lifting the Learning

Ignite inquiry and discovery with mind maps. Ignite inquiry and discovery with mind maps.

Flipping your classroom?  Consider mind and concept mapping.  Instead of your students turning to their neighbors to discuss, have them turn to their neighbors to brainstorm and design.  Simple Post It notes work.  Google Drawing works for electronic maps and infographics.  For online courses, here is an article that lists “24 Essential Mind Mapping and Brainstorming Tools” at http://mashable.com/2013/09/25/mind-mapping-tools.  Alan Henry suggests a few more at http://lifehacker.com/five-best-mind-mapping-tools-476534555.

Look for our Concept Mapping workshops this fall moderated by Nancy Wozniak.  The workshop will be hosted face-to-face and in webinar format.  Email me for more information – nancy.wozniak@stonybrook.edu.

Creative Inquiry in Large Lectures Creative Inquiry team activities for students in large lectures.

How do you flip your classroom?  Post some more suggestions.

View original post

Language Predjudice in the Classoom

My colleague, Stephanie Wade, Lecturer SBU Writing and Rhetoric, shared with me, “What speech do we like best? Language expresses who we are, and who we want to be. It can also unite or divide us.” about language prejudice. I had to think of how faculty tend to view our students’ microblogging and texting as dummying down the English language and communications… NIMC (Not In My Classroom). Are our language skills falling to pieces or are we transitioning to another format?  Is Web 2.0 applications ruining the English Language? I look forward to your comments. 

http://www.pbs.org/speak/speech/

Attitude runs deeper than Learning Spaces

Thoughts on Learning Spaces Blog
I posted my bewilderment (almost rage) on the Thoughts on Learning Spaces blog back in 2008 and provided a link to the post that set me off.  The blogger referred to the student population as Gen Y, lazy learners, throughout the presentation … AHHH!   Fortunately, the blog and post no longer exist, but the blogger is still around and publishing.  The presentation is no longer accessible.   However, I saved this direct quote from the 2008 post.  It still burns me as I reread it.

You know why a student would prefer to look at a picture or watch a video? Because it’s way easier than reading something that would nearly always be more informative about the subject at hand. You know why a student would be more interested in producing, say, a video than writing a paper? Because writing well is DIFFICULT and it’s far easier to gloss up poor research by packaging it in a video format that appears to involve a lot of work. Yes, older people who think that games, social networks, collaborative learning environments, and the creation audiovisual mashups are the future of education, the basic message I’m sending here is that young students don’t want to learn, they want to play, and presentations like the one I saw today essentially seem to be saying that we need to support this play (masked as educational needs) as much as possible in order to try to get some learning in there.  I’d like to hear some thoughts and comments from our group on this issue. It’s an important topic. Please comment on the discussion forum, “Are we experiencing a Generational Gap in Education?I so curious to know if the blogger has had a change of opinion towards multimedia, games, and the value of play in learning.  As I reread this post, the statement, “You know why a student would be more interested in producing, say, a video than writing a paper? Because writing well is DIFFICULT and it’s far easier to gloss up poor research by packaging it in a video format that appears to involve a lot of work.

First, it’s obvious the blogger has never produced a podcast or digital story.  I’d like to think this person has had a change in attitude about multimedia, games, and learning, but I seriously doubt it.  I’ll share my personal teaching story about a student triumphant and a video podcast later.   However, have we improved as educators since this blog was active and accessible?  It’s 2015, have we learned anything about our students as individual learners?  Does this attitude still exits in the hallowed halls of Academe?

I posted and commented on another blog from 2009 was “A Vision of Students Today (What Teachers Must Do) .  At the time, the blogger seems as frustrated as me.  The blogger posts,
HOW DID INSTITUTIONS DESIGNED FOR LEARNING become so widely hated by people who love learning? It’s been almost two years (spring 2007) since Dr Michael Wesch of Kansas State University invited the 200 students in his “Introduction to Cultural Anthropology” class to tell the world what they think of their education by helping him script a video for YouTube
http://www.clappingtrees.com/archives/2009/01/a-vision-of-students-today-what-teachers-must-do.

 

Have we grown as educators since 2008-09?  What is the Vision of Students Today in 2015 classroom?  What must teachers do today…2015?